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Social Studies

Introduction

Course Titles and Descriptions12th Grade Social StudiesSocial Studies Electives

The primary purpose of the Shaker High School social studies department is to help students develop reasoned and informed decision making processes for the public good, as citizens of a culturally diverse, democratic society. Within an integrated grades 9-12 program of study that incorporates history, the social sciences, geography, sociology, political science, psychology, civics, and criminal law, scholarship is developed through a comprehensive multi-disciplinary approach.

At the high school level, the social studies program prepares students with core knowledge as well as authentic, real world skills while simultaneously addressing the New York State Learning Standards. Students in grades 9 and 10 study Global History and Geography, culminating in the Global History Regents examination. The focus shifts to United States History and Government in 11th grade, a course that also ends with a Regents exam. In order to satisfy graduations requirements, seniors may choose between various one semester courses. Students may have an opportunity to request other electives that do not satisfy core requirements but may be taken in addition to them.

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Course Titles and Descriptions

110 AP World History (P)111 Global History 9H (P)112 Global History 9R114 Global History 9B (P)120 AP World History (P)121 Global Studies 10H (P)122 Global Studies 10R (P)125 Global Studies 10B (P)130 AP United States History (P)131 United States History and Government 11H (P)132 United States History and Government 11R (P)135 United States History and Government 11B (P)942GR/942GA Global History AIS Lab942HR/942HA United States History AIS Lab12th Grade Social Studies 

110 AP World History (P)

Full Year – 1 Unit

Prerequisites: 

  1. Recommendation of the 8th grade social studies teacher; and
  2. Achievement of consistent grades of A+ in grade 8 social studies; and
  3. Demonstration of superior critical reading and writing skills based upon departmental, district, and national standardized assessments, or
  4. Permission of the Department Supervisor. 

The purpose of AP World History is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global resources and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. This course highlights the nature of historical changes and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies.  Focused primarily on the past thousand years of the global experience, the course builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional, and technological events that, along with geography, set the human stage prior to 1000 C.E. Chronology and the study of historical themes from the organizing principles for dealing with change and continuity from that point to the 19th century. Equal emphasis is placed on historical analysis of the Western and non-Western world. This program option is particularly designed for those students whose records indicate superior achievement in the area of social studies, who evidence a serious academic interest in academic challenge in the social science field, and who display a readiness to begin a program sequence that can include the earning of Advanced Placement credit in grades 10, 11 and/or 12, as well as New York State Regents credit. The final examination in this course will be a test developed at Shaker High School. Expected range of achievement for this course will be 90-100.

111 Global History 9H (P)

Full Year – 1 Unit

Prerequisites: 

  1. Recommendation of the 8th grade social studies teacher; and
  2. Successful completion  of social studies 8 enriched; and
  3. Achievement of consistent grades of A in grade 8 social studies; and
  4. Demonstration of critical reading and writing skills based upon departmental, district, and national standardized assessments, or
  5. Permission of the Department Supervisor.

Study is focused on developing historical perspectives on world history from prehistoric times to the early 19th century. Relationships and links are explored in order to learn how the past influences the present. Political, social, and economic themes such as nationalism, ideology, economic systems, modernization and human rights are introduced within a geographic and cultural context. Preparation of a research paper is a requirement of the course. Students electing this course should be prepared to deal with subjects in an analytical and interpretive manner. Expected range of achievement is 85-100.

112 Global History 9R

Full Year – 1 Unit

In studying world history from prehistoric times to the early 19th century, unit work will center on political, social and economic topics studied within a historical context. Students will be required to make connections among concepts and themes in Global History and link them across time and place. Instruction will also emphasize the application of social studies skills in multiple historical settings. Specific time will be devoted to preparing a paper on some topic related to the course of study.

114 Global History 9B (P)

Full Year – 1 Unit

Prerequisite: Recommendation of 8th grade social studies teacher (based on results of standardized testing and class performance).

This course is designed for students requiring special attention in social studies skills. By examining the geography, history, and political, social, and economic life of peoples in different world historical eras from prehistoric times to the early 19th century, students are helped to develop the understanding and skill required in an increasingly complex global society. Emphasis is placed on helping student’s social studies skills such as locating and analyzing data from different sources.

120 AP World History (P)

Full Year – 1 Unit

Prerequisites:

  1. Recommendation of the 9th grade social studies teacher; and
  2. Completion of Advanced Placement World History 9th grade within expected range; and
  3. A final school mark of 93 or above in English 9H and Global History 9H; and
  4. Demonstration of superior critical reading and writing skills based upon departmental, district, and national standardized assessments, or
  5. Permission of the Department Supervisor.

The purpose of AP World History is to develop a greater understanding of the evolution of global resources and contacts, and interaction with different types of human societies. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. The course highlights the nature of historical changes and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. Focused primarily on the 19th and 20th century global experience, the course builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional, and technological events that, along with geography, set the stage from the 19th century to contemporary times. Chronology and the study of historical themes form the organizing principles for dealing with change and continuity. Equal emphasis is placed on historical analysis of the Western and non-Western world. This program is particularly designed for those students whose records indicate superior achievement in the area of social studies and who evidence a serious academic interest in the social science field. The final examination in this course is the New York State Regents Exam in Global History. The Advanced Placement Examination is also required of all students taking this course. A fee is charged by the College Entrance Examination Board and must be paid to the Department Supervisor.

121 Global Studies 10H (P)

Full Year – 1 Unit

Prerequisites:

  1. Recommendation of the 9th grade social studies teacher; and
  2. A final school mark of 88 or above in Global History 9H, or
  3. A final school mark of 93 or above in English 9R and Global History 9R; and
  4. Demonstration of critical reading and writing skills based upon departmental, district, and national standardized assessments, or
  5. Permission of the Department Supervisor.

Study is focused on developing historical perspectives on world history from the early 19th century to contemporary times. Relationships and links are explored in order to learn how the past influences the present. Political, social, and economic themes such as nationalism, ideology, economic systems, modernization and human rights are introduced within a geographic and cultural context. Completion of a research paper is a requirement of the course. Students electing to take the course should be prepared to deal with subjects in an analytical and interpretive manner with demonstration of such ability in present course work as one criteria for recommendation. Expected range of achievement is 85-100. The final examination in this course is the New York State Regents Exam in Global History.

122 Global Studies 10R (P)

Full Year – 1 Unit

Prerequisite: Global Studies 9.

In studying world history from the early 19th century through contemporary times, unit work will center on political, social and economic topics studied within a historical context. Students will continue to be required to make connections among concepts and themes in Global History and link them across time and place. Preparation will also emphasize the teaching and application of social studies skills in multiple historical settings. Specific time will be devoted to preparing a research paper on some topic related to the course of study. The final examination in this course is the New York State Regents Exam in Global History.

125 Global Studies 10B (P)

Full Year – 1 Unit

Prerequisite: Global Studies 9.

This course is designed for students requiring special attention in social studies skills. By examining the geography, history, and political, social, and economic life of peoples in different world historical eras from the early 19th century to contemporary times, students are helped to develop the understanding and skills required in an increasingly complex global society. Emphasis is placed on helping student’s social studies skills, such as locating and analyzing data from different sources. The final examination in this course is the New York State Regents Exam in Global History.

130 AP United States History (P)

Full Year – 1 Unit

Prerequisites:

  1. Recommendation of the 10th grade teacher; and
  2. Completion of AP World History 10th grade within expected range of achievement.
  3. A final school mark of 93 or above in English H and Social Studies H; and
  4. Demonstration of critical reading and writing skills based upon departmental, district, New York State, and national standardized assessments, or
  5. Permission of the Department Supervisor.

Major periods in United States history such as the colonial period, American Revolution, Jacksonian Era, Civil War and Reconstruction, Populist-Progressive period, the New Deal, and post-World War II United States are studied in order to develop understanding and appreciation of political, economic and social development of the United States. Students are given the opportunity to develop skill proficiency in reading and critically analyzing historical material, weighing and interpreting historical material, weighing and interpreting historical evidence, and making conclusions based on such evidence. This course is intended to substitute for United States History and Government H for selected students who have successfully completed the H level social studies program in grades 9 and 10, and who wish to earn advanced college placement or credit in United States History. Award of such credit is ultimately determined by the college based on the student’s test grade in Advanced Placement United States History as developed and scored by the Educational Testing Service. Students will also earn Regents credit by taking the New York State Regents Examination in United States History and Government which will serve as the final test grade. The Advanced Placement Examination is required of all students taking this course. A fee is charged by the College Board and must be paid to the Department Supervisor.

131 United States History and Government 11H (P)

Full Year – 1 Unit

Prerequisites:

  1. A final school mark of 88 or above in Global Studies 10H, or
  2. A final school mark of 93 or above in Global Studies 10R; and
  3. Demonstration of critical reading and writing skills based upon departmental and New York State Regents standardized assessments, or
  4. Permission of the Department Supervisor.

This course treats the evolution of the political system, economic organization, civilization, and foreign policy of the United States in a chronological framework. Constitutional and governmental issues receive special emphasis. Students are challenged to explore and evaluate such references as will contribute to a critical analysis of major issues. Use is made of supplementary outside readings, source materials and documents, and interpretive studies. The final examination in the course is the New York State Regents Examination in U.S. History and Government. Students are required to prepare at least one research paper on a topic of their choice relative to their program.

132 United States History and Government 11R (P)

Full Year – 1 Unit

Prerequisite: Global Studies 10. 

This course will include a chronological survey of United States history in general, but the emphasis will be on the U.S. as a developing industrial and postindustrial nation. Constitutional and legal issues will be explored in-depth, as well as the problems of a dynamic industrial society in an increasingly complex and technology-oriented world. Classwork and homework is supplemented by use of various source materials and readings. Students are required to research and prepare at least one research paper on some aspect of the course. The final examination in the course is the New York State Regents Examination in U.S. History and Government.

135 United States History and Government 11B (P)

Full Year – 1 Unit

Prerequisite: Global Studies 10.

This course is offered for those who have evidenced particular need for improving their social studies skills as well as their ability to read and write well. The final examination is the Regents Examination in United States History and Government.

942GR/942GA Global History AIS Lab

No Credit

This remedial lab offers academic intervention services to students who have not yet passed the New York Regents Examination in Global History. Also, students who may require additional development of social studies skills may be placed in this lab as preparation for the state assessment. Course content and test taking skills are emphasized.

942HR/942HA United States History AIS Lab

No Credit

This remedial lab offers academic intervention services to students who have not yet passed the New York State Regents examination in United States History. Also, students who may require additional development of social studies skills may be placed in this lab as preparation for the state assessment. Course content and test taking skills are emphasized.

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12th Grade Social Studies

160 AP U.S. Government/Economics H (P)160M AP Macroeconomics/Government H (P)161 Participation in Government 12H (P)143 Economics and Economic Decision Making 12H (P)183 Politics and Economics of Gender181 Politics and Economics of U.S. Foreign Policy180 Politics of Green Economics182 Inequality in America156 The United States and Humanitarian Crises in the 20th Century157 Media & Politics148 The American Economy in a Global Market149 Economics: Principles and ApplicationsSocial Studies Electives

A student must take a total of 1 unit of credit in Social Studies 12 in order to graduate. This requirement is fulfilled by either taking a one-semester course in Economics and a one-semester course in Participation in Government OR one of the options that meet those requirements. In order to be eligible for graduation, a student must receive a passing grade in each semester course. Grades for semester courses are determined by averaging two quarterly grades with a final examination or its equivalent such as a term paper or course project.

In every level of Participation in Government, a final project is necessary in order to fulfill the course requirements. The final project is based on the completion of at least 6 verifiable hours of community service. Individual teachers will provide a more specific description of the project and related community service.

Seniors may take additional semester courses to earn elective credit. These electives are located below. However, enrollment in these courses is limited.

160 AP U.S. Government/Economics H (P)

Full Year – 1 Unit

Prerequisites:

  1. Recommendation of the grade 11 social studies teacher; and
  2. A final school mark of 93 or above in English and Social Studies 11H; and
  3. A grade of 90 or above on the New York State Regents in U.S. History and Government; and
  4. Demonstration of critical reading and writing skills based upon departmental, district, New York State, and national standardized assessments, or
  5. Permission of the Department Supervisor.

This full-year course integrates curriculum and instruction in Economics and U.S. Government and Politics. Students who elect this course fulfill New York fourth year social studies requirements in Economics and Participation in Government. The first half of the course emphasizes the major concepts and themes of economics integrated into broader context of United States government and politics. Focus is on microeconomics (the various components of the United States’ economy: business, consumers, laborers, capitalists and government) and macroeconomics (the overall operation of the economy in terms of production and prosperity). In the second half of the course, students study the Constitutional underpinnings of the United States government, political beliefs, and behavior of citizens in order to develop understanding and appreciation of the institutions and policy processes of the national government. Major topics include: the Congress, the Presidency, Federal Courts, the Bureaucracy, political parties and interest groups, and public policy. Students will be expected to weave economic principles and practices into their analysis of the U.S. political system. The Advanced Placement Examination is required of all students taking this course. A fee is charged by the College Board and must be paid to the Department Supervisor. In addition, a final project is necessary in order to fulfill the course requirements. The final project is based on the completion of at least 6 hours of community service.

160M AP Macroeconomics/Government H (P)

Full Year – 1 Credit

Prerequisites:

  1. Recommendation of the grade 11 social studies teacher; and
  2. A final school mark of 93 or above in English and Social Studies 11H; and
  3. A grade of 90 or above on the New York State Regents in U.S. History and Government; and
  4. Demonstration of critical reading and writing skills based upon departmental, district, New York State, and national standardized assessments, or
  5. Permission of the Department Supervisor.

AP Macroeconomics is a full-year course, which includes a nine-week political science intensive that fulfills the New York State Participation in Government graduation requirement. Approximately 27 course weeks are devoted to the curriculum objectives for AP Macroeconomics as prescribed by the College Board. This course provides an introduction to concepts consistent with those covered in a typical college introduction macroeconomics course. The emphasis will be on application and not memorization. Students will be expected to successfully demonstrate their ability to identify and apply twenty-five different macroeconomic models to a variety of questions and problems. Students will develop critical thinking skills and learn the tools of analysis economists use to arrive at plausible conclusions. This course will provide instruction in basic economic concepts such a production possibilities, comparative advantage, supply and demand and circular flow as well as the components of the gross domestic product, models for analyzing unemployment and inflation, fiscal and monetary policy, including the tools of the Federal Reserve Board. Students complete the course by taking the Advanced Placement Macroeconomics Exam in May.

161 Participation in Government 12H (P)

Either Semester – 1/2 Unit

Prerequisite: 93 or above in 11R level courses or 88 or above in 11H level courses.

In this semester course an opportunity is provided for a more thorough inquiry into the nature of political behavior and how political conflicts are resolved. Examination is made of how popular participation occurs within the American political system today. Leadership and decision making in a democratic system are also topics for discussion, using the various national, state, local and political institutions as vehicles for building understanding. In addition, the unofficial role of interest groups and the mass media is also taken into consideration. The course is recommended for any student who is considering political science in college, who may be majoring in the social sciences, and who seeks a broad background in the social studies for later study in college. In addition, a final project is necessary in order to fulfill the course requirements. The final project is based on the completion of at least 6 hours of community service.

143 Economics and Economic Decision Making 12H (P)

Either Semester – 1/2 Unit

Prerequisite: 93 or above in 11R level courses or 88 or above in 11H level courses.

This semester course begins with a study of the basic ideas and concepts of economics as part of the social studies.  Study is made of microeconomics (the various components of American economy: businesses, consumers, laborers, capitalists and government) and macroeconomics (the overall operation of the economy in terms of production and prosperity). The success of the United States economy relative to other systems in meeting the universal economical goals and problems is analyzed as part of the course. The course is recommended for any student who is considering economics in college, who may be majoring in the social sciences, or who seeks a broad background in the social studies for later study in college.

183 Politics and Economics of Gender

Either Semester – 1/2 Unit

This semester long course will provide students with a framework to understand the role that gender plays in defining and determining access to leadership and power in the U.S., both politically and economically. We will explore the historical roots of women’s inequality, with a focus on economic issues such as the gender pay gap, work and motherhood, and structural inequalities in the labor force. We will also explore public policy issues related to gender, such as affordable childcare, paid maternity leave, minimum wage and affirmative action. We will compare the status of women in the US to other countries around the world, and look at examples of women in political and economic leadership positions. This course will meet either the 1/2 unit of Economics OR 1/2 unit of Participation in Government requirement. This course is open to seniors.

181 Politics and Economics of U.S. Foreign Policy

Either Semester – 1/2 Unit

This semester long course examines U.S. foreign political and economic decisions and the processes by which they are made in an interconnected world and global economy. This course will study the institutions and individuals responsible for foreign policy decisions and consider current U.S. foreign policymaking with a special emphasis on the policy context and choices. This course will provide a dual understanding of the United State’ role in world affairs through the lens of the political and economic motivations that shape American actions abroad. Students will actively participate in the classroom to better understand the roles and responsibilities of American and global citizenship. In addition, a final project is necessary in order to fulfill the course requirements. This course will meet either the 1/2 unit of Economics OR 1/2 unit of Participation in Government requirement. This course is open to seniors.

180 Politics of Green Economics

Either Semester – 1/2 Unit

This semester long course aims to provide students with an exploration into the concepts of scarcity and self-interest in the evolving field of Green Economics. Examination is made into the economic and political trade-offs necessary in pursuing energy security and environmental protection at the local, state, national, and international levels. Consideration is given to the economic goals of price stability, full employment, efficiency, equity, and growth, as well the debate over the level of government involvement in the economy. Analysis of public policy will be used to investigate the roles of individuals, linkage institutions, and levels and branches of government in addressing the challenges of environmental degradation and energy independence. In addition, a final project is necessary in order to fulfill the course requirements. This course will meet either the 1/2 unit of Economics OR 1/2 unit of Participation in Government requirement. This course is open to seniors.

182 Inequality in America

Either Semester – 1/2 Unit

This semester long course provides an exploration of the various ways in which class inequality impacts American society. The course will analyze how members of various social classes live and relate to one another in America. We will explore the politics of inequality with a focus on strategies used by the wealthy to maintain the status quo. We will also explore the hopes and dreams of all middle class, working class and poor people. This course will explore the meaning of the “American Dream” and discuss the obstacles that impede the ability of many Americans to partake in that dream. The readings in this course will emphasize the dynamics of inequality as they intersect with class, race and gender. This course will explore the multitude of ways in which inequality is the result of the way our society is structured. Students will be expected to respond verbally and in writing to a number of different forms of content. We will be utilizing newspaper articles and long-form journalism, book excerpts, and a variety of other media based content. This will be a project-based curriculum with research papers, essays, film analysis and presentations among the assessments used for the course. This class will also require that students are active participants in class discussions. This course will meet either the 1/2 unit of Economics OR 1/2 unit of Participation in Government requirement. This course is open to seniors.

156 The United States and Humanitarian Crises in the 20th Century

Either Semester – 1/2 Unit

This semester long course will examine America and its role during major human rights violations in foreign affairs during the 20th century. Students will study the role, concept, and structure of the United States’ government in relation to its citizens and the international community through case studies of humanitarian crises in the 20th Century. At the end of the course students will examine America’s current relationship to humanitarian crises and engage in the civic and democratic process to raise understanding beyond the classroom regarding the crises. This course meets the 1/2 Unit Participation in Government requirement. This course is open to seniors.

157 Media & Politics

Either Semester – 1/2 Unit

This semester long course is designed to engage students in a study of the ways in which mass media influences elections and public policy. Students will study such topics as the free press in American history; journalistic ethics; the use of popular media (music & movies) to engage civic participation; the influence of social media on elections; civic literacy and the critical evaluation of propaganda and “fake news;” the consequences of media consolidation and the decline of print media; and the risks and rewards of civic transparency (Wikileaks). Within the course, students will analyze reporting on current events to determine bias and credibility, examine case studies of First Amendment debates, evaluate media campaigns by advocacy groups, and prepare a full, multi-media campaign in support of a public policy issue. The final grade in this course will be the average of the two quarterly grades and a third grade earned by completing a required final project. This course meets the ½ Unit Participation in Government requirement. This course is open to seniors.

148 The American Economy in a Global Market

Either Semester – 1/2 Unit

Successful completion of this semester course will satisfy the 1/2 credit graduation requirement of Economics for seniors. This course focuses on the current state of the American economy by analyzing US trade deals, government regulation, unemployment, the role of financial institutions, and the gross domestic product. The American economy is studied in-depth independently. Subsequently, the influence of a global marketplace on the American economy and the American economy’s influence on the world will be examined. Through the exploration of current events the key principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics will be revealed, such as supply and demand and scarcity. Lastly, the role of the individual within American capitalism as a consumer, voter, investor, worker, and entrepreneur will be analyzed with practical applications. This course meets the 1/2 Unit Economics requirement. This course is open to seniors.

149 Economics: Principles and Applications

Either Semester – 1/2 Unit

This semester long course will examine real world applications of key economic concepts related to students’ lives. Focus will emphasize personal responsibility and concrete practical skills necessary to ensure financial well-being. Sound management practices will be analyzed as they relate to the American Capitalist System, the impact of individuals in Factor and Product Markets, and the roles of individuals in the formation of economic policy. This course meets the 1Ž2 Unit Economics requirement. This course is open to seniors.

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Social Studies Electives

137 Introduction to Sociology138 War in the United States145 Introduction to Psychology 12E154 Criminal Law

137 Introduction to Sociology

First Semester – 1/2 Unit

This class provides an introduction to basic sociological concepts and themes relevant to the modern world. In addition to core ideas and principles, the course covers topics such as the social construction of the self, race and gender inequality, the sociology of sport, and deviance and social control. While emphasizing college preparatory skills, this elective is appropriate for all social science majors and those looking to enter fields such as social work, psychology, or as a general education requirement for non-majors. Students in this course will have the opportunity to enroll in the SUNY University in the High School Program. As a result, students may earn three SUNY course credits upon successful completion of course work. This course is open to seniors in good academic standing only. In the event more students request the course than space allows, a lottery will be held to determine the course roster.

138 War in the United States

Second Semester – 1/2 Unit

This senior level elective explores the connection between the national security interests of the United States and its democratic principles. Case studies of conflicts from the Vietnam War to the War on Terror will examine the instruments of national power, the long-term effects on US society, and the participatory role of the citizen. Students will gain insight into philosophical and psychological nature of warfare. Using a variety of teaching methods, the course will explore the purposes, objectives, and means of the way the US has conducted military operations. In addition to battles and tactics, an assessment of the impact of war on US society and policy will be addressed. This course is open to seniors in good academic standing only. In the event more students request the course than space allows, a lottery will be held to determine the course roster.

145 Introduction to Psychology 12E

First Semester – 1/2 Unit

This semester course is an introductory college preparatory course incorporating important concepts from the fields of psychology. Emphasis is placed on studying human behavior and understanding human nature. Among the unit topics are: the nature of the behavioral sciences and human behavior, physical and mental ability, cultural and social determinants of behavior, abnormal behavior, and behavior therapy and modification. Within each of these units, study is made from a psychological and/or sociological perspective. Specific topics include human aggression, adolescence, alienation, intelligence, and schizophrenia. Emphasis is placed on psychological research through written projects culminating in a final paper involving the use of multiple research strategies. The final grade for this course is an average of two quarterly grades and final projects.

This course is open to seniors in good academic standing only. In the event more students request the course than space allows, a lottery will be held to determine the course roster.

154 Criminal Law

Second Semester – 1/2 Unit

The criminal law elective is designed to offer the student a glimpse into the complex world of 1st degree felony crime. The course is divided into two phases: The first phase includes crime scene investigation, evidence gathering, and pretrial discovery. The second phase introduces the student to trial preparation and trial techniques. Students will present a mock trial at the culmination of the course as a summative evaluation. This presentation requires each student to learn the criminal code and criminal procedure. Students must cooperate on a legal team, work under the pressure of a deadline, and meet a set of standards demanding independent research and investigation. Students who are interested in advancing their understanding of criminal law or planning to enroll in a pre-law major in college will find this course to be a solid introduction to the principles of criminal responsibility and criminal punishment. The proper use of legal terminology and the ability to demonstrate an ability to grasp legal courtroom maneuvering are key to the student’s success. The first quarter grade will be evaluated on two components, crime scene investigation skills and analysis of evidence to be presented at trial. The final exam will consist of written trial preparation and participation in the Mock Trial presentation. This course is open to seniors in good academic standing only. In the event more students request the course than space allows, a lottery will be held to determine the course roster.

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